History

Degrees

Classes

HIS 110 : World Civilization I

This course offers a general history of civilization, emphasizing the economic, intellectual, political and cultural aspects that have contributed to the development of our world. It covers the period up to 1715. 

Credits

3

HIS 112 : World Civilization II

General history of civilization emphasizing the economic, intellectual, political, and cultural aspects that have contributed to the development of our world. Covers the period since 1715.

Credits

3

HIS 201 : Western Civilization I

Major political, economic, cultural, and social forces and events from the time of the ancient Hebrews and Greeks to the present. The first semester will cover the ancient Hebrews and Greeks through the Reformation. The second semester will cover the Early Modern period through the present.

Credits

3

HIS 202 : Western Civilization II

Major political, economic, cultural, and social forces and events from the time of the ancient Hebrews and Greeks to the present. The first semester will cover the ancient Hebrews and Greeks through the Reformation. The second semester will cover the Early Modern period through the present.

Credits

3

HIS 210 : Latin American History

This class surveys Latin American history from the eve of first encounters between Americans and Europeans in 1492 to the present: over 500 years of history for a vast region spanning Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean, and South America. Students will explore historical processes like encounters between Europeans, Americans, and Africans; Spanish and Portuguese colonialism in the New World; struggles for independence and construction of new Latin American states; class struggle, revolution, and counterrevolution in the twentieth century; and globalization, neoliberalism, and inequality in the twenty-first century.
 

Credits

3

HIS 220 : Comparative Revolutions

This course offers a comparative history of a historical phenomenon: revolution. Throughout the semester, this class will consider multiple modern revolutions across the globe. It will begin with an exploration of the political theory of the Enlightenment, before considering specific revolutions, including but not limited to the American, French, Haitian, Mexican, and Russian. Besides comparing and contrasting various revolutions, this course will ask a number of questions related to revolutionary change, including what causes revolutions? Who makes a revolution? What leads to success or failure in a revolutionary situation? How should we define conceptions such as democracy, freedom, and liberty? 

Credits

3

HIS 280 : Historiography and the Historical Method

This course explores the process of doing history, practice those processes, and discuss the merits of different approaches to studying the past. Students will be exposed to the concept of historiography, its role within the discipline, and its importance regarding historical research. This course prepares students for upper level courses, including HIS 480. Required for history major and minors. Serves as a prerequisites for all upper level history courses, including American and European. This course should be taken during the sophomore year. It cannot be taken any later than the Fall semester of their junior year.

Credits

3

HIS 300 : The Cuban Revolution

An exploration of the complex history of the Cuban Revolution. We will embrace a methodology that examines Cuban history from within, while also devoting attention to the significant role that Cuba and Cubans have played in the international arena, especially since 1959. While much of the scholarship on Cuba has taken a top-down approach focused on political leaders and their policies, we will use creative examination of primary sources to build our own, bottom-up analysis of the social and cultural impacts of the revolution. We will seek to develop answers to difficult questions about the nature of popular democracy and totalitarian rule, the success of the Cuban Revolution in fulfilling its stated goals, and the ways that the revolutionary project has impacted the real lives of real people. 

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Or permission of instructor

Corequisites

HIS 301 : British History I

The principle events surrounding the formation of England from the Norman Conquest to the end of the Stuart monarchy in 1714 with additional examination of England’s relation to its Celtic neighbors, the beginnings of the British Empire, and the creation of Great Britain.

Credits

3

HIS 302 : British History II

The main political, social, economic, and cultural developments in Britain since 1714. Students will also examine British colonialism, Britain’s role in international affairs, and relations among the various territories that make up the United Kingdom itself.

Credits

3

HIS 303 : History of Ireland

Survey of the history of Ireland from the arrival of the Celts to the present-day conflict in Northern Ireland with major emphasis on explaining how Ireland’s history shaped and continues to shape its present.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HIS 201 or permission of instructor.

HIS 304 : History of Scotland

An examination of Scotland’s historical development and distinctiveness within the period concerned. Students will also examine how Scotland was influenced and shaped by engagement with other cultures and societies.

Credits

3

HIS 305 : Britain and the British Empire

A wide-ranging introduction to the history of Britain and the British Empire from the 16th century to the present with emphasis on the changing political system, the development of the British state, and the maintenance of an overseas Empire.

Credits

3

HIS 306 : Celtic World in Film

Varying studies of cinematic representations of the Celtic world, its geography, people, and history. Students will examine films by English, Scottish, Welsh, Northern Irish, and Irish directors that use English, Scottish, Welsh, Norther Irish, or Irish settings and/or whose subject matter is the history and/ or character of the Celtic world. Prerequisites will vary.

Credits

3

HIS 307 : Scottish Enlightenment

An introduction to the Scottish Enlightenment, including Scottish culture, learning, development, improvement, and influence.

Credits

3

HIS 310 : Colonial America

Was the American Revolution radical? This course will investigate this crucial question and, in so doing, demonstrate to students that there are layers of meaning to our founding moment that our current discourse around democracy and justice tend to obscure. Course content will focus on constitutional issues and juxtaposing these issues with social and economic history, allowing students to compare political theories of independence with the ways in which life was lived on the ground across colonial America.

Credits

3

HIS 312 : Founding America

An exploration of the era during which Europeans established polities and societies on this continent, with emphasis on the diversity of peoples and cultures present and how this diversity made possible what would become the United States of America. Students will explore the histories of the various regions, colonies, people, and important changes that took place culturally, socially, religiously, economically, and politically across the 150 years of colonial history.

Credits

3

HIS 316 : 16th Century Europe

A survey of the main developments in European history between 1480-1610. Topics include the rise of the Habsburgs under Charles V; the impact of the Reformation; the Religious Wars; Spanish colonization overseas; the Military Revolution; and the Habsburg bid for European hegemony under Philip II; and the expansion of the Ottoman Empire in the Western Mediterranean and Eastern Europe.  

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Or permission of instructor

HIS 317 : U.S. and the World I

This course explores the origins of the United States’ relationship with the globe, ca. 1776 until 1919. Throughout the semester we will examine how domestic politics, gender, ideology, and race shaped broader US interactions with the globe. We will also consider how a revolutionary and anti-colonial republic became an imperial power. 

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HIS 318 : U.S. and the World II

This course investigates the history of the United States’ interactions with the globe after World War I, including with Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Middle East. It will introduce students to important events, people, and the historiography of the subject. 

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Or permission of instructor

HIS 319 : 19th Century Europe

This course treats the main event in the History of Europe from 1814 to 1914. It will treat such topics as the Congress of Vienna; the age of Metternich; the liberal revolutions especially the those of 1848; the Crimean War; the rise of Louis Napoleon; the Wars of Italian and German Unification; the rise of Socialism and Anarchism; New Imperialism; and the political polarization of Europe at the end of the century.  Attention will also be given to artistic and literary movements such as Romanticism; Realism; and Naturalism. 

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Or permission of instructor

HIS 325 : History and Film

A showcase of several films based on real historical events. Students will research both the films and the actual events from the standpoint of professional historians, ascertain their historical veracity, and demonstrate how films are the reflection of the society that produced them. Film topics will vary but treat such issues as war, revolution, imperialism, colonialism, and the struggle of classes and social order.

Credits

3

HIS 340 : The French Revolution and Napoleon

An exploration of the causes and consequences of this very decisive period which witnessed the destruction of the Old Regime and the birth of the modern state. Students will consider the ideology of the Enlightenment, social and political reforms, the forces of radicalism and popular violence, and the origin of nationalism, as well as examine the career of Napoleon and its impact on Europe.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HIS 201 or permission of instructor.

HIS 353 : The Evolution of War

An exploration of warfare from earliest times to the present, viewing war as a social institution that must be seen in its fullest cultural contextto be understood. Students will examine notonly the historical development of war, but its interrelationships with society and technology as well. Although the course focuses mainly on the West, it will have a significant global component with the military experience of other cultures serving as a vehicle of comparison.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HIS 201 and 202 or permission of instructor.

HIS 355 : The Reformation

An exploration of the causes and consequences of the Reformation with emphasis on understanding the role of the major reformers such as Luther, Calvin, and Loyola. In addition, students will explore the Reformation’s sociopolitical and cultural dimensions.  (Same as RPH 358)

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HIS 201 or permission of instructor.

HIS 356 : The Spanish Golden Age

Spanish culture and society during the Golden Age of the 16th and 17th centuries. Through the study of historical texts, students will explore some of the major issues of the age (the Inquisition, the Counter-Reformation, the problem of ethnic and religious minorities, and the rise and fall of an empire).

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HIS 201 or permission of instructor.

HIS 357 : Early Modern France

The history of France from the “new monarchs” of the 15th century to the end of the Ancient Regime in 1789. Course content will focus on students gaining an understanding of such traditional themes as the consolidation of the French kingdom, the Renaissance monarchy, the wars of religion, the development of absolutism, Louis XIV, the Enlightenment, and the forces that would eventually unleash the French Revolution. Great stress will be placed on understanding the larger economic and social forces that helped shape French history. In addition, students will explore some of the recent work in the areas of gender and cultural history.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HIS 201, or permission of instructor.

HIS 361 : The Civil War

An examination of the Civil War as a military conflict with great emphasis on understanding the strategy, operations, and tactics employed by both sides. In addition, students will study the war in the context of international diplomacy and domestic politics as well as its impact on the nation.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HIS 101 or permission of instructor.

HIS 367 : Life in 20th Century America

The history of the United States from the 1900s to the 1990s. Social history, domestic politics, influence of the media and popular culture will serve as themes while considering such topics as the Progressive Era, The Roaring Twenties, the home front during World War II, the Great Depression, Cold War culture, counterculture during the 1960s, and others.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HIS 102 or permission of instructor.

HIS 470 : Celtic Studies Research

Students will write a research paper on a literary or historical topic pertaining to the British Isles, the British Empire, or the Celtic daspora.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Students must complete all of the other requirements of the Celtic studies minor.

HIS 475 : Seminar in History

These reading- and writing-intensive seminars provide opportunities for concentrated work on a particular theme, national experience, or methodology to develop subject expertise and research acuity. Students will critically assess previous historians' work and refine their expository skills in writing and speech. Topics vary by instructor.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Or by permission of the instructor.

HIS 480 : Senior Seminar

Preparation of a major research paper with some study of methodology in history.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Senior standing, HIS 101, HIS 102, HIS 201, HIS 202, and HIS 280